• Engine Oil/Cabin Heating RSS Feed

    by Published on 06/12/2010 06:32 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. l Chapter 12 - Engine/Propeller,
    3. n Chapter 14 - Final Assembly, Finishing
    Not the dreaded 3003 tubing!

    It's Deja Vu all over again. I swore that we wouldn't fly with these soft aluminum tubes again, and here we are about to do it. So, a couple of things, we've studied carefully how you're supposed to insure that your flares are good. Secondly, if we find that the larger hard tubing does give off enough heat, and increase oil flow to the nose enough to make a real difference we will go with a harder alloy of tubing for the long-term fix. So, here we've taken the stock 1/2" 3003 AL tubing and run it to just in front of the canard bulkhead to give it a try, and we took the third cooler out of the loop. This essentially returns us to the configuration that we flew with in 2008 without issue (at least oil temperature!). If we still have hot oil after this, perhaps and detailed engine investigation is in order. I'm also catching up on pictures here, so I'm posting pictures of my 5" Tornado fan from Jegs and it's mount, as well as the cooler temperature panel I made for testing purposes, and the pitot/manometer setup that I bought to test the airflow side of the equation. We still haven't gotten this to work yet, so that's a minor aggravation. Finally you can see that VGs that I put in front of the NACA in the nose. I can't tell that this has done anything for me yet. Oh, and there's a picture for the smoke generator holder (I bought smoke generators from McMaster to do air flow studies of my overhead NACA ducts).



    Not the dreaded 3003 tubing!
    ...
    by Published on 03/07/2010 08:37 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. e Chapter 6 - Fuselage,
    3. l Chapter 12 - Engine/Propeller
    New heater duct

    Here are some pictures for you of the new heater installation. Here you can see the new duct that replaces the one from the NACA and accepts the air from the bilge fan. We still use the standard flapper valve to take the air to the keel or dump it overboard. In the keel we have outlets next to each seat at the floor level. The second picture shows the duct leaving the fan to the duct, and the two outlets from the flapper coming together and then combining at the T on the way to the keel. You can see here the lip we made to seal the discharge.


    New heater duct
    ...
    by Published on 02/28/2010 09:39 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. e Chapter 6 - Fuselage,
    3. l Chapter 12 - Engine/Propeller

    No picutres yet, but Bob has been glassing in a flox flange below the flapper valve that seals off of the overboard hot air dump duct. This never quite sealed right, but we didn't consider it a big deal when we had a ton of NACA air to supply. Now that we'll only have bilge fan reciruclating air pressure, we need to make it count. We're also making duct cover to replace the piece that used to come from the nose NACA that will close off the duct and give us a place to connect the bilge fan hose This will still allow us to dump hot air overboard or bring it to the cabin using the existing control and the fan to move the air.
    by Published on 02/21/2010 09:40 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. e Chapter 6 - Fuselage,
    3. l Chapter 12 - Engine/Propeller
    Naca plugged, inside

    Here you can see we've cleaned up the heater installation a bit, and removed the oil lines to the "standard" NACA location. We're going to set up so we can recirc air through the cabin, to the heating element, and back to the cabin, or dump the heat overboard. I'm actually not sure how effective pump hot air overboard will be, but it seems like a capability that I should maintain. If all works as expected, we'll remove the NACA later and plug up that hole, maybe even gaining a little speed.



    Naca plugged, inside
    ...
    by Published on 03/25/2004 11:41 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. l Chapter 12 - Engine/Propeller
    Assembling the firewall-mounted rear oil cooler bracket

    The rear mounted oil cooler comes as a kit from the factory. After some playing around with the three pieces and looking at the pictures on the factory website, it becomes apparent how this goes together. Basically you drill a 4" diameter hole in the cover-plate and install a ducting flange with pop rivets, then rivet the standoff brackets such that they form a chamber with the firewall. The exit of the cooler dumps into the cowling. We will be installing an exhaust augmentation system that will draw this hot air, along with that coming down from the roof-mounted NACA scoops, out of the cowling through Bernoulli effect of the exhaust pipes jetting through an escape duct (thereby creating a slight vacuum).


    Rear Oil Cooler Bracket
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